Best Differential Diagnosis Book

VITAMIN C FOR BIPOLAR


ImageI have looked at bipolar and what I found interesting was the study that says Vitamin C may help. The way I read the study, EDTA is not good for those who are Manic Bi-Polar and Vitamin C is beneficial. From the study, If I was bi-polar, I would stay away from foods with vanadium such as breads and cereal with wheat, radishes, black pepper, mushrooms, soy products, shellfish, shark, tuna, commercially raised chicken and turkey (they are given meal with high levels of vandium), vinegar, pickles, reduce or eliminate refined sugar, corn, olive oils, sunflower seeds, oats, rice, carrots, green beans, lettuce, cabbage, parsley, and dill seed. Foods low in vanadium include fresh fruits and vegetables. I would subtitute my foods high in vandium with more fresh fruits and vegetables(other than those listed) rather than eating wheat based foods like pasta, pizza, sandwiches etc… I make a fruit smoothie every morning and juice fruits and veggies.

Vitamin C helps the body to reduce its load of vanadium and this has been studied for its possible role in treatment of bipolar disorder.35 A double-blind trial found that both manic and depressed bipolar patients were significantly improved after one-time administration of 3 grams of vitamin C, compared with a placebo.36 The same study found that both manic and depressed patients did better on a reduced-vanadium diet compared to a normal diet. Another double-blind study reported that 4 grams per day of vitamin C in combination with a drug known as EDTA (which also helps remove elements such as vanadium from the body) was helpful to depressed bipolar patients but not to those experiencing mania.37 Until more is known, people with bipolar illness should avoid supplements containing vanadium and consider supplementing with vitamin C.
http://www.vitacost.com/science/hn/Concern/Bipolar_Disorder.htm

I would also suggest going to the Vitamin C forum if you have questions about Vitamin.

From Owen’s advice to others, I would take high doses of Vitamin C but make sure to use sodium ascorbate crystals for the best results. I would start off slow 500mg but work my way up to 4,000 mg per day.
http://www.curezone.com/forums/f.asp?f=400&p=9

I have looked at bipolar and what I found interesting was the study that says Vitamin C may help. The way I read the study, EDTA is not good for those who are Manic Bi-Polar and Vitamin C is beneficial. From the study, If I was bi-polar, I would stay away from foods with vanadium such as breads and cereal with wheat, radishes, black pepper, mushrooms, soy products, shellfish, shark, tuna, commercially raised chicken and turkey (they are given meal with high levels of vandium), vinegar, pickles, reduce or eliminate refined sugar, corn, olive oils, sunflower seeds, oats, rice, carrots, green beans, lettuce, cabbage, parsley, and dill seed. Foods low in vanadium include fresh fruits and vegetables. I would subtitute my foods high in vandium with more fresh fruits and vegetables(other than those listed) rather than eating wheat based foods like pasta, pizza, sandwiches etc… I make a fruit smoothie every morning and juice fruits and veggies.

Vitamin C helps the body to reduce its load of vanadium and this has been studied for its possible role in treatment of bipolar disorder.35 A double-blind trial found that both manic and depressed bipolar patients were significantly improved after one-time administration of 3 grams of vitamin C, compared with a placebo.36 The same study found that both manic and depressed patients did better on a reduced-vanadium diet compared to a normal diet. Another double-blind study reported that 4 grams per day of vitamin C in combination with a drug known as EDTA (which also helps remove elements such as vanadium from the body) was helpful to depressed bipolar patients but not to those experiencing mania.37 Until more is known, people with bipolar illness should avoid supplements containing vanadium and consider supplementing with vitamin C.
http://www.vitacost.com/science/hn/Concern/Bipolar_Disorder.htm

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s